Social Media: Improve Your Policy and Posture

January 4, 2018 — Leave a comment

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Social media can be a nightmare for quite a lot of people in many ways. It can be used to distribute all kinds of malicious contents (malicious links, malware). Personal details shared on social media can help hackers gain access to your account or find high-value targets for cybercrime, fraud or attacks. Frontpoint offers awesome monitoring packages, so a review of Frontpoint is a necessity.

Here are six unique ways you can improve your social media security policy and posture:


Password Hygiene

Although some of your employees may frown at it, but requiring a password change every 60 to 90 days is something you should keep doing. An occasional change of passwords can limit the chances of a hacker gaining access to your site. Analysts said that maintaining a good password history is a global best practice.

Use two-factor authentication

Social media analysts have confirmed that two-factor authentication ensures all externally accessible applications or websites are secure.

Your passwords can easily be acquired by a third party if it is related to your email address. Thus, using two-factor authentication will provide another layer of security to your account.

Identity theft is high these days; this is why you should use other measures like retinal features and facial features to safeguard your sensitive data.

Think before you share

A lot of things are happening in the digital world today. Social media remains a great platform to share memories, thus many people are tempted to share personal details beyond limits. Many of them don’t know the legal implications of their actions.

With the advent of smartphones and social media, it becomes extremely easy for most people to snap pictures and share with their contacts. Most social media addicts upload up to 500 pictures

yearly. Some people have been sued for uploading the pictures of others without their permission, thereby tampering their right to privacy and security.

Be careful who are your friends on social media, and the type of personal details you share. Before you share anyone’s pictures, make sure you get their permission. If they didn’t permit you, please make sure you don’t do so.

Update privacy settings

Some social media platforms have an option which allows you to switch your account to a private mode. Even the ones that haven’t come with the option of managing who sees your status updates, check-ins, or photos.

Update your privacy settings, so that you can decide to make your profile invisible and/ or inaccessible to third parties and search engines. You can decide to share your personal profiles only with your inner circle. You are at liberty to make your posts visible to the public, friends or keep personal details only to yourself.

If you want to hide from someone or share your information with specific people, there is an option for that. Here, you have the right to review, approve or delete posts you were tagged in and/ or remove tags from some people.

Protect your accounts beyond the site’s options

Passwords are designed to safeguard our information on social media. The best way to protect your account beyond the site’s options is by increasing your password efficiency. Create a strong password that has at least 12 characters. The shorter your passwords, the easier it would be for hackers to have access to your site.

To be on safer side, always change your passwords at least three to four times every year and/ or change them any time you feel your account may have been compromised. Try as much as possible to avoid the ‘remember password’ option on most sites. Clear your browser history where you think your passwords might have been saved. Install a firewall to protect your device from hackers or outside users.

Test security before going live

Before you go live with new applications such as software applications, standalone, mobile, web app or infrastructure, try as much as possible to ensure it is secure.

Analysts said that performing a penetration test on new environments, applications and technologies before they go live can actually save heartache, money and time. Through a penetration test, you could determine what could be attacked, how it can be done, and how to fix the issue.


Thanks to Matt Tricot for sharing his wisdom and expertise of social media security with us at The Life You Can Afford to Live. You can learn more about additional security measures at Home Security List. We would love to hear your input on our social media channels at Facebook, twitter or LinkedIn.

Todd Burkhalter

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Todd is an entrepreneur, author, life, business and financial strategist. As founder of Drive Planning he and his team serves their members throughout the Southeastern United States. For over 20 years he has been sought after to help business leaders, individuals and couples achieve more in business and life.

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